Intel chooses Ireland over Israel

Peter Clarke LONDON – Intel Corp. has chosen its Irish Leixlip campus, rather than Fab 28 at Kiryat Gat in Israel, as the location to receive an upgrade to 15-nm production technology, according to a report in Globes, which referenced unnamed…

Peter Clarke

LONDON – Intel Corp. has chosen its Irish Leixlip campus, rather than Fab 28 at Kiryat Gat in Israel, as the location to receive an upgrade to 15-nm production technology, according to a report in Globes, which referenced unnamed sources.

The selection of Ireland over Israel was, apparently a reaction to the Israel government’s offer to Intel of up to 1 billion shekels (about $290 million) to expand manufacturing operations in the country. Intel had asked for about $600 million the report said.

The Israeli government’s counter offer was tied to job creation at two sites, Fab 28 at Kiryat Gat and a chip assembly unit to be located in the north of the country with a proposed site at Beit She’an. Intel has been underwhelmed by the offer and unhappy about plans that Israel would make inward investors compete to receive money from a fixed fund.

As a result Intel has decided to invest in its facilities in Ireland, the report said quoting an unnamed Israeli government official. “Intel will only officially announce its decision at the end of the year, but we understand from the spirit of the talks that it’s going to Ireland,” the report quoted him saying. However, Intel is still interested in receiving support in return for creating a chip assembly operation at Beit She’an, the report added.

Intel closed down its Fab 14 in Leixlip near Dublin in the summer of 2009 reducing the number of fabs it operates on the campus to three, labeled Fabs 10, 24 and 24-2. In January 2011 Intel committed to spend about $500 million rebuilding the shell and infrastructure of the old Fab 14 building, but without saying what plans it had for manufacturing process technologies in the reconditioned shell. It is not known whether will stick with calling the building Fab 14 or rename it.

EE Times