Carbon nanowires obtained by tempering diamantane dicarboxylic acid inside carbon nanotubes

Carbon-based nanomaterials have unique properties that make them useful for many technical applications, including lightweight construction, electronics, energy generation, environmental technology, and medicine. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, an international team of researchers has now introduced a new process for…

Carbon-based nanomaterials have unique properties that make them useful for many technical applications, including lightweight construction, electronics, energy generation, environmental technology, and medicine. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, an international team of researchers has now introduced a new process for the production of especially fine carbon nanowires from carbon in the diamond configuration. In this process, molecules with a diamond-like structure are linked together inside a carbon nanotube.

Carbon occurs in several configurations. Graphite and diamond have long been known. While graphite consists of two-dimensional, honeycomb-like sheets of carbon, diamonds are three- dimensional, cage-like structures consisting of puckered six-carbon rings. A variety of new nanoconfigurations have also been discovered: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene (graphite monolayers), nanodiamonds, and diamondoids. Diamondoids are actually cycloalkane molecules with a skeleton of carbon configured in “cages”, like diamond. They can be viewed as miniature diamonds with hydrogen atoms bound to their outer surfaces.

Nanowires are needed for many nanoscale applications. Various types of nanowire have been produced, including some with diameters ranging from about 50 to 100 nm, made of carbon in the diamond configuration. A team of researchers from Japan, China, Germany, and the USA wanted to reduce the dimensions of nanowires further into the sub-nanometer range. Such tiny wires could be of use in the tips of scanning tunneling microscopes, which are devices that can be used to scan the topology of a surface to produce extremely high-resolution images.

Researchers led by Hisanori Shinohara at Nagoya University (Japan) came up with the idea of fusing diamondoids into longer, superfine wires. To make this work they had to resort to a trick: carbon nanotube “molds”. For their starting material, the scientists chose diadamantane, a diamondoid made of two diamond-like cages. They attached a carbonic acid group at each end of these molecules. The molecules are transferred to the gas phase for the synthetic procedure. They are sucked into the tiny carbon nanotubes by capillary action. The best nanotube molds were found to be those with an inner diameter of about 1.3 nm. Within the nanotubes, the diamondoids line up like a string of pearls. Heating these to about 600 °C under a hydrogen atomsphere causes a polymerization/fusion reaction in which the individual diamondoid molecules link up through their carbonic acid groups to form a long “wire” with a diameter of about 0.78 nm. The cage-like structure is maintained.
By using theoretical calculations and various analytical techniques, the scientists were able to demonstrate that the carbon in the wires is indeed in a diamond-like structure.
Currently, the scientists are elaborating an ultrasonication extraction technique for releasing the nanowires from the surrounding carbon nanotubes.

More information: Evidence of Diamond Nanowires Formed inside Carbon Nanotubes from Diamantane Dicarboxylic Acid, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201209192Journal reference:

Angewandte Chemie

Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Provided by

Wiley

view popular
send feedback to editors

5 /5 (4 votes)

1
2
3
4
5

Move the slider to adjust rank threshold, so that you can hide some of the comments.

Display comments:
newest first

Rank

1
2
3
4
5

5 /5 (4 votes)

more news

Related Stories

Oct 07, 2009
0
Atomic Wire with Protective Sheath: Stable Metal Nanowires One Atom Wide Inside Carbon Nanotubes

Apr 22, 2011
0
New carbon allotrope could have a variety of applications

Aug 16, 2012
0
Crystals from chaos: Physicists observe new form of carbon

Nov 08, 2010
0
Structure of new form of super-hard carbon identified

Relevant PhysicsForums posts

Gibbs’ Phase Rule
Mar 04, 2013
I am having some trouble fully understanding the basics and I just wanted to see if somebody would please clarify this for me.

First, say you have a one component system in two phases: vapor and…

Is there a “Stuff -> Materials it’s made of” reference around?
Mar 02, 2013
This is somewhat a borderline question, but I guess the Materials subsection of the forum is the best place for it.

Yesterday I broached a bottle of wine, one with bubbles (that’s the most…

Layer-by-layer deposition
Feb 27, 2013
Hi

I was hoping you could help me a little bit regarding the layer-by-layer deposition process. I have not been able to find a book in my campus library that talks about this particular process,…

Reflectance of nanotubes
Feb 25, 2013
hi guys, I’m working about nanotechnology, and my current research is about nanotubes. Based on my observation, as the nanotubes length increased the reflectance also increased, one of my possible…

How to capture carbon and sulfur molecules in anodizing of aluminum.
Feb 24, 2013
I have a need to capture some free sulfur and graphite molecules in the anodizing layer of aluminum, preferrably a hard anodizing which uses higher current levels and lower temperature than normal…

Photoelectrodeposition for 3D Printing
Feb 24, 2013
3D printers are receiving a lot of attention in the news these days, because they are seen to be a potential disruptive technology. However, most devices of this type are very limited in the…

More from Physics Forums – Materials & Chemical Engineering

More news stories

Researchers find cicada wing structure able to kill bacteria on contact (w/ video)

(Phys.org) —A combined team of researchers from Spain and Australia has discovered what they claim is the first known instance of a biomaterial that can kill bacteria on contact based only its physical …

Nanotechnology / Nanophysics

20 hours ago |
5 / 5 (23) |
7
|

New player in electron field emitter technology makes for better imaging and communications

(Phys.org) —Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, College Park, have built a practical, high-efficiency nanostructured electron source. Described …

Nanotechnology / Nanophysics

22 hours ago |
5 / 5 (2) |
2
|

First discovery of a natural topological insulator

(Phys.org) —In a step toward understanding and exploiting an exotic form of matter that has been sparking excitement for potential applications in a new genre of supercomputers, scientists are reporting …

Nanotechnology / Nanomaterials

22 hours ago |
5 / 5 (5) |
0
|

Temp-controlled ‘nanopores’ may allow detailed blood analysis

(Phys.org) —Tiny biomolecular chambers called nanopores that can be selectively heated may help doctors diagnose disease more effectively if recent research by a team at the National Institute of Standards …

Nanotechnology / Bio & Medicine

22 hours ago |
not rated yet |
0
|

Nanoclusters in steel add strength, stability under irradiated conditions

Safely containing and retarding the mobility of reactor fuels are longstanding U.S. Department of Energy and Department of Defense concerns, making the radiation stability of the materials used for structural …

Nanotechnology / Nanomaterials

20 hours ago |
5 / 5 (1) |
0

Researchers find emperor penguins outer feathers colder than surrounding air

(Phys.org) —A research team made up of members from France and the U.K. has discovered that when in cold temperatures, the outer feathers of the emperor penguin are actually colder than the surrounding …

Biology / Plants & Animals
24 minutes ago |
not rated yet |
0
|

Is this peptide a key to happiness?

(Medical Xpress)—What makes us happy? Family? Money? Love? How about a peptide? The neurochemical changes underlying human emotions and social behavior are largely unknown. Now though, for the first time in humans, scientists …

Medicine & Health / Psychology & Psychiatry
18 minutes ago |
not rated yet |
0
|

Some brain cells are better virus fighters

(Medical Xpress)—Viruses often spread through the brain in patchwork patterns, infecting some cells but missing others. New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis helps explain …

Medicine & Health / Medical research
8 minutes ago |
not rated yet |
0
|

Extinct Tassie tiger cut from wildlife protection list

A ban on the international trade of the Tasmanian tiger, the buff-nosed kangaroo rat and the pig-footed bandicoot was lifted Thursday—because the species have been extinct for decades.

Biology / Ecology
29 minutes ago |
5 / 5 (1) |
0

Aerobic exercise promotes post-concussion healing, researchers find

(Medical Xpress)—Further evidence that a program of controlled, progressive aerobic exercise may help restore normal cognitive function in patients who have sustained a concussion has been published by …

Medicine & Health / Neuroscience
23 minutes ago |
not rated yet |
0

NJ flood mapper: A new tool for coping with sea-level rise

(Phys.org) —If sea level rises as scientists predict, will your New Jersey home or parts of your town be underwater?

Space & Earth / Earth Sciences
22 minutes ago |
not rated yet |
0